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The Best Conservation Projects of 2020

It’s that time of year once again for our popular round-up of favourite conservation projects! Gathered from the most clicked on projects that we share with our followers on Linkedin, even though it’s been a challenging year for the profession, we haven’t been short of intriguing projects to marvel at. From analysis from the past now becoming treasures to reference, to new projects dedicated to preserving the new wave of protest art that has become so important in 2020. Which one is your favourite?


From Trash to Treasure

Where: Cincinnati Art Museum

Why? Learning from test and analysis is a key part of progress in the world of conservation and its interesting to take a step back and realise how far techniques and processes have come when old experiments are found. Done by conservators 30-40 years ago, take a look at these now treasured experiments that the Getty have helped found a new home for.

Read more here.

Revisisting a Conservation Project

Where: The Getty

Why: The tallest object ever displayed at the Getty at about 19 feet and it weighing in at about 2.5 tons, the conservation of an ancient Obelisk was no mean feat. Two years on, the project is fondly looked back on in its entirety.

Read more here.

Preserving Protest Art

Where: University of Delaware

Why? In a year of protests, Balboa Art Conservation Center’s new program, Preserve Community Art, kicked off with a project gathering and preserving social justice art. In a year that many of us will never forget, it’s important that these artworks are preserved for future generations to learn from.

Read more here.

An Unexpected Delivery

Where: The British Library

Why? What do you do when 85 rolls form the Kings Library arrive unexpectedly at your studio in need of cleaning, repair, housing, cataloguing and a new storage space?

Find out here.

Continuing Conservation through a Pandemic

Where: Cincinnati Art Museum

Why? While many conservation professionals were furloughed or quarantined, here’s a conservation treatment that continued during the stay-at-home period for one Cincinnati Museum’s paintings conservator.

Read more here.

Compelling Viewing

Where: MoMA

Why? We featured this video in a previous round-up but it’s popularity means we couldn’t not feature it again! This hypnotising video see conservator Diana Hartman tackles the question of how to repair holes in the painting’s canvas by microscopically reweaving it.

Watch here.


Conversation and Conservation in Glass

Where: National Museums Scotland

Why? This thorough and extremely insightful project, the Dan Klein Conservation project in fact, brings new dimensions to the world of glass conservation. We particularly enjoyed reading about how the artist’s input added a whole new dimension of understanding to then go on to conserve the artwork or piece.

Read more here.

New discoveries about the altarpiece of St George

Where: The V&A

Why? A remarkable example of the Valencian school in the ‘International Gothic Style’, which combines medieval and Renaissance elements, we enjoyed reading about the different possible treatments and the collaborative approach between the V&A and Institut Valencià de Conservació i Restauració de Béns Culturals.

Read more here.

Saving an Ancient Roman Sculpture, Step by Careful Step

Where: The Getty

Why? We love this in-depth, step by step journey that allows readers to follow along in photos as Getty conservators and scientists devote 15 months to preserving an ancient treasure from one of Italy's great museums.

Take a look here.

A Gentler Approach to Fixing Wobbly Legs

Where: West Dean College

Why? Last but not least, this project looks at an alternative to the default way of fixing wobbly furniture legs. Simple yet effective, and a one that proved popular with our followers!

Read more here.

Looking for more projects to read? Head over to our LinkedIN page and give us a follow!

Contact

Willard Conservation Ltd
The Workshop,
Leigh Road,
Terminus Industrial Estate,
Chichester
PO19 8TT
United Kingdom

Tel        +44(0)1243 776928

Email   sales@willard.co.uk

© 2021 Willard Conservation Ltd.

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